Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Peeking Into History by Guest Tanya Eavenson

For the last several years I’ve been working on a Historical Romance series set in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s. During this time, my research has led me to eBay on several occasions to search for books to better help me understand and visualize people, places, and things.

Around Christmas last year, I asked my husband in passing to find me a mid to late 1800’s book on eBay. I didn’t care what it was, but something having to do with Boston since this is where the first of the series begins. To my surprise, not only did he buy one, but he also purchased three McGuffey books and today I’m honored to share them with you along with what I’ve learned in the process of peeking into history.

Journey back in time with me when things were simpler and life was slower on the farm or cattle ranch, but people worked harder, longer. Children were expected to complete chores before heading off to their one-room wood-framed schoolhouse, where they’d learn with seventeen other children. Whether sitting in desks or long benches, the children were taught from different books depending on their grades, first to eighth.
McGuffey’s Eclectic Primer (Copyright 1867)











I love how in these pictures you get a glimpse of the child’s drawings and how they traced their letters.

McGuffey’s Eclectic Primer (Copyright 1867)















McGuffey’s Eclectic Spelling Book (Copyright 1865) 








It amazes me how beautiful their handwriting is by the time they “graduate” from the eighth grade.





McGuffey’s Eclectic Primer
















McGuffey’s Second Eclectic Reader (Copyright 1867)


This Second Eclectic Reader and the McGuffey’s Eclectic Primer show above were used by different children within the same family.











I want to leave you with this last picture from the Second Eclectic Reader. I wonder what people will think when they peek into our history, or our children’s school books years from now?

Second Eclectic Reader
“With all thy soul love God above; And as thyself thy neighbor love.”

Amen!




Tanya Eavenson enjoys spending time with her husband, and their three children. Her favorite pastime is grabbing a cup of coffee, eating chocolate, and reading a good book. Tanya is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers, Word Weavers International, and writes for Christ to the World Ministries. You can find her at her website http://www.tanyaeavenson.com/ on Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, Google, or on Amazon.




He will fight for her at any cost...

Elizabeth Roberts can't remember her past, and the present is too painful. She turns to nightclubs and drinking to forget her infant daughter's death, her husband's affair.

When his wife's coma wiped out the memory of their marriage, Chris Roberts found comfort elsewhere. He can't erase his betrayal, but with God's help he’s determined to fight for Elizabeth at any cost.

She wants to forget. He wants to save his marriage. Can they trust God with their future and find a love that’s unconditional?


You can purchase Unconditional at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, or Kobo.

18 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing. Books like that are just so precious.

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    1. I couldn't agree more, Mary! I love being able to look back in time, even for a peek. =)

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  2. Lovely, Tanya! Thanks for sharing. :)

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    1. Thank you, Carole! I'm so glad you enjoyed the pictures!

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  3. As a reading specialist, I LOVE these books! I actually bought a reprinted version. I've often imagined what it'd be like teaching in a one-room schoolhouse using these books with students of all ages. Thanks for giving us a peek at these original primers, Tanya!

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    1. Thank you, Deb! I've often pictured what it would feel or smell like inside the schoolhouse. The pages in the primers are very brittle and have a heavy musty odor. In a way, I've envisioned the schoolhouse with the same musty smell. Unless of course the teacher opened the door to allow the air to circulate the room. =) So glad you enjoyed them!

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  4. Your husband is definitely a keeper! I think they used the McGuffey Reader in Pocahontas TN in the 1920s.

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    1. Wonderful to see you, Pat! He sure is!!! I'll tell him you said so. =) Wow! Don't you just love history... I only wish I could retain it all in. Thanks for saying hello, my friend!

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  5. I love seeing these pics. Thanks so much for sharing with us today, Tanya.

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    1. Thank you so much for the invite, Crystal! It's great to be here with you all!

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  6. I attended a two-room school in Pelican, Alaska, in 1958-59. We didn't use McGuffey readers, but it was an experience I'll never forget. Tanya's book intrigues me.

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    1. AnnaLee, what an experience! I'm sure you won't forget! I would have loved to have seen it. =) Thank you so much for your sweet words about Unconditional and visiting with us today. Hope you have a lovely week!

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  7. I loved seeing these pictures and especially enjoyed seeing the beautiful handwriting. It is sad that this is a lost art!

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    1. Thank you, Connie! And I couldn't agree more. It is a lost art. How I wish I could write so lovely!

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  8. When my children were being home-schooled, we used a Charlotte Mason inspired language arts book called Primary Language Lessons by Emma Serl. The first copyright was 1911, but the most recent reprints were nearly identical to the original. The retro look makes these older school books so endearing.

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    1. Terrill, How interesting! And I like how the reprints were nearly identical. It's so important for those of us who love history. It helps us to try to imagine what it was like in 1911. Thank you for stopping by and sharing!

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  9. I do enjoy seeing old books! I enjoyed today's post..

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    1. I'm so glad! Thank you for visiting, Deanna!

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