Thursday, February 27, 2020

The Major's Daughter by Regina Jennings

Ever since I had the opportunity to visit Oklahoma with my mother-in-law and learn some of it's history, I've loved to read books set there. This one was of particular interest since it's set during one of Oklahoma's races for land, which I also wrote about in my book, To Claim Her Heart.

I loved the way Regina delved into the hard work and determination it took to not only compete for the land, but also to build and improve on it. She also highlighted some of the disputes over property that occurred during this time period. I found her new book to be a fun read. I can tell that the author spent a bit of time researching and it showed seamlessly throughout her story.

If you love learning about some of the real events from our Nation's history as well as a fun romance, you'll be sure to enjoy The Major's Daughter.




Jodie Wolfe creates novels where hope and quirky meet. She is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW), Romance Writers of America (RWA), and COMPEL Training. She's been a semi-finalist and finalist in various writing contests. A former columnist for Home School Enrichment magazine, her articles can be found online at: Crosswalk, Christian Devotions, and Heirloom Audio. She's a contributor and co-founder of Stitches Thru Time blog. When not writing she enjoys spending time with her husband in Pennsylvania, reading, walking, and being a Grammie. Learn more at www.jodiewolfe.com.
 

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Tidbit Tuesday: 15th Amendment




How familiar are you with the U.S. Constitution? How about the Bill of Rights? The other amendments? There is so much history to the United States, teachers must have a tough time trying to present the vast amount of information to students.

My current work-in-progress, Dinah’s Dilemma, takes place in the American west during 1870. Life was vastly different one hundred and fifty years ago. Electricity had been invented by that time, but it wouldn’t be until 1882 that parts of Manhattan saw electricity introduced in houses. Gas light and candles would remain popular for another fifty years. Inventions during 1870 included the bee smoker, the rotary can opener, and the feather duster.

More importantly, that year also saw a great change with the passage of the 15th Amendment. Ratified on February 3rd, the law states that the “right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”

Having been freed by the 13th Amendment and granted citizenship by the 14th Amendment, African Americans men must have been thrilled to receive the privilege of the right to vote. (Remember, women of any color were unable to vote until the 19th Amendment was passed in 1920) Unfortunately, poll taxes, literacy tests, and “grandfather clauses” that excluded anyone whose ancestors hadn’t voted in the 1860s were just a few of the ways used to disenfranchise the men. Social and economic segregation added to the problem.

Not until the Voting Act of 1965, passed in March of that year, would deterrents to exercising the right to vote be abolished.

What was the first election during which you were old enough to vote?



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Linda Shenton Matchett writes about ordinary people who did extraordinary things in days gone by. Her latest release, Under Cover, features WWII war correspondent, Ruth Brown. A volunteer docent and archivist for the Wright Museum of WWII, Linda is also a trustee for her local public library. She was born a stone’s throw from Fort McHenry and has lived in historic places all her life. Now located in central New Hampshire, Linda’s favorite activities include exploring historic sites and immersing herself in the imaginary worlds created by other authors. Visit her website where she blogs about history, mystery, and faith. Sign up for her newsletter and receive a free short story. You can also connect with Linda on FacebookTwitter, and Pinterest.

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Author interview with Jodie Wolfe

So excited to visit with Jodie Wolfe, as she is one of our own here at Stitches Thru Time. A huge congratulations on the recent release of her book, Taming Julia:
 
In 1875, Kansas bachelor Drew Montgomery's sole desire is to serve God, but his congregation's ultimatum that he marry or leave, forces him to advertise for a wife by proxy.

Jules Walker strides into Drew's life wearing breeches and toting a gun and saddle--more cowboy than bride. After years on the trail, she's not exactly wife material, but she longs for home and family, and will do anything to ensure Drew never discovers what she really is.



What made you decide to become a writer?
I fell in love with writing when I was in grade school. In 2nd grade we had an assignment to write a poem. I wrote about my favorite thing in the world at the time - Snoopy. Soon after, I started creating little stories. I was hooked. I knew when I grew up I wanted to be a writer.


Where did the inspiration for your latest book come from? 
I've always been intrigued by the whole mail-order bride possibility. How could a woman answer an advertisement, choosing to leave all she'd known in order to take a chance on love and find a new path in life? How did she choose to leave the familiar and step into the unknown with someone she'd never met?
The more I studied stories and clippings from the past, the more my mind kept spinning with ideas. What would happen if a pastor was dictated by his congregation that if he wanted to keep his job, he had to find a wife by a certain time? What if the wife he advertised for was completely different than what he expected? How would he handle it? That nugget of an idea is what spurred the inspiration for Taming Julia.

How does your faith and spirituality work in with your writing? 
My faith in God is just part of my everyday life, so it naturally comes out in my writing as well. My characters struggle like I struggle. You'll find them often praying or calling out to God for answers to their problems.


What do you want readers to come away with after reading your books?
That true hope can only be found in Christ. He is the greatest encouragement in my life, along with my husband.


What is one of your favorite scenes in Taming Julia?
One of my favorite scenes takes place later in the book. I can't share a lot about it so I don't spoil it for you, but it takes place in Texas. My husband's aunt and uncle live next door to the area I wrote about, so they were a tremendous help with being accurate in my description. Then a couple years ago while visiting them, we got special permission so I could see it first-hand. It's in the hill country of Texas where an unexpected gorge has been carved out because of a waterway.


What is your favorite thing about where you live?
 I live between two sets of mountains. From our house we can see both of them. We have a state college in our town, along with Amish farmers, and rural countryside. It's a nice mix and very little traffic. I can make it across town in about ten minutes, depending on traffic lights and school buses. :)


What are you working on next? 
I'm working on two books - a sequel to Taming Julia (part of the Burrton Springs Brides series), as well as a book set in the town where I live dealing with belonging entitled, Hannah's Quest.
Bio
Jodie Wolfe creates novels where hope and quirky meet. She is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW), Romance Writers of America (RWA), and COMPEL Training. She's been a semi-finalist and finalist in various writing contests. A former columnist for Home School Enrichment magazine, her articles can be found online at: Crosswalk, Christian Devotions, and Heirloom Audio. She's a contributor and co-founder of Stitches Thru Time blog. When not writing she enjoys spending time with her husband in Pennsylvania, reading, walking, and being a Grammie. Learn more at www.jodiewolfe.com.


Purchase Links for Taming Julia:












A huge thanks to all of you for joining Jodie and me today!