Monday, September 7, 2015

Name Game with Guest Darlene Franklin #Giveaway

By Darlene Franklin

Leah became pregnant and gave birth to a son. She named him Reuben, for she said, “It is because the LORD has seen my misery. Surely my husband will love me now.” Genesis 29:32

Abraham had Isaac. Isaac had Esau and Jacob. Where were the descendants like the stars in the sky? Jacob provided the answer. His wives gave birth to twelve sons and at least one daughter—enough to found the twelve tribes of Israel. But who named them?

The question is not an idle one. God changed Abram's name to Abraham. He told Abraham to name his son Isaac, and He changed Jacob's name to Israel.

Jacob let his wives choose. And oh, what names they came up with: names full of joy and hope, rivalry and tension, man and God. Consider:

  • Judah - Praise God
  • Levi - Connect with my husband
  • Asher - Happy
  • Dan - Vindication

Rachel, so long barren, chose poignant names for her two sons: Joseph, "May God add another son to me," and Ben-oni, "son of my pain," on her deathbed. Jacob changed Ben-oni to Benjamin, son of my good fortune.

My son and daughter-in-law waited until after my grandson was born to choose his name: Isaiah Jaran Franklin. My son said "Our prayer is that he will grow up to cry out (Jaran) 'The Lord is salvation' (Isaiah) so that all may be free men (Franklin)." I love it!

Jordan's (granddaughter's name) is equally thoughtful. Born nine months after my daughter Jolene's death, she was given Jolene's initials and her middle name: Jordan Elizabeth Franklin. Her birth was a life-affirming gift from God in the midst of grief, and her name reflects that.

In my book, An Apple for Christmas, an orchard grower named MacIntosh Cortland named his twin daughters Pippin and Margil. All of their names reference a different variety.

Like Abram and Jacob, God has chosen a new name for all of His children (Revelation 2:17).

Best-selling author Darlene Franklin’s greatest claim to fame is that she writes full-time from a nursing home. She lives in Oklahoma, near her son and his family, and continues her interests in playing the piano and singing, books, good fellowship, and reality TV in addition to writing. She is an active member of Oklahoma City Christian Fiction Writers, American Christian Fiction Writers, and the Christian Authors Network. She has written over fifty books and more than 250 devotionals. Her historical fiction ranges from the Revolutionary War to World War II, from Texas to Vermont. You can find Darlene online elsewhere at www.amazon.com/Darlene-Franklin/e/B001K8993A/ and www.facebook.com/darlene.franklin.3.



To celebrate her new release, Darlene is giving away one ebook copy of An Apple for Christmas to one of this post's commenters (once a minimum of 5 commenters has been reached). The winner will be announced in next week's Weekly Windup post (09/14/15). 




Ruby Nelson trades her job in the laboratory for teaching in a small girls’ school in Vermont. Twin sisters challenge her position—and their father captivates her imagination. Will the orchard grower graft Ruby onto his heart?

www.amazon.com/Apple-Christmas-Novella-Traditions-ebook/dp/B012BLSKQG/
 Also available in the 8-1 anthology Christmas Traditions:
www.amazon.com/Christmas-Traditions-Romance-short-stories-ebook/dp/B0136ZFNOS/

16 comments:

  1. I appreciate names that have special meaning.

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  2. Loved this. VERY interesting. I usually check out meanings and origins of names too. Great post!

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  3. Great post! I love your grandchildren's names.

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  4. I'd love to hear your name stories! Thanks for coming by, Mary, Caroline, Patricia.

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  5. One of my grandsons is also named Jeran (spelled slightly differently) 😃

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  6. So interesting about your family's naming tradition. Loved reading about it.

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    1. Jaran and Jolene's names (my 2 children) are another story--glad you enjoyed it, Robin.

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  7. I live in Oklahoma too! I haven't read any of your books but I look forward to

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    1. Hello, then, Karen! I have several books set in Oklahoma, but An Apple for Christmas takes place in Vermont.

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  8. Hey, Angie, I didn't know that! I've seen a few variations on the name over the years.

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  9. I too have been fascinated by the origin of names and their meanings. Would love to read your book.

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    1. Hi Charlotte, I agree with your interest.

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  10. I am interested in the origin of names and the story behind people's chosen name. What a blessing your grandchildren were given with their names. I would love to have a chance to read your book.
    Deanne Patterson
    Book1lovingmomma at gmail dot com

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    1. Deanne, what's the story behind your name? Do you know?

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  11. A couple of years back, my 16 year old daughter was enthralled with names, their origins, and ideas for her own future babies. My daughter is a planner. heehee. She read baby name books for her research. I remember being young and having all of my kids' names and origins picked out. Needless to say, neither of my childrens names came from that list.

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    1. Terrill, I remember my husband and I had very different tastes in names.
      So we didn't use my favorite names either, but I bet you, like me, came up with names deeply meaningful to us.

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