Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Shoshone Love by Guest Angela K Couch

by Alfredo Rodriguez
In the story I just finished, a historical romance, I spent a lot of time pouring over Shoshone traditions for everything from preparing food to burying their dead, including how they were joined as man and wife. Because, let’s be honest, romance and weddings often go hand in hand…unless the heroine really didn’t want to marry that guy—but that’s a conversation for another day.

The Shoshone have some beautiful traditions for their weddings that I would like to share now so you don’t have to wait for my manuscript to become a book.

The ceremony is performed by the spiritual leader of the tribe. He gives them advice and rules to live by, which usually includes being chaste and true to each other. Then he might take a hair from each of their heads and tie the strands together as a symbol of their union. A family member sometimes hides this so the couple has to remain together, not being able to separate (divorce) until the hairs are unbound.

The bride and groom also said vows, often offered as poems of devotion and love. The following is one such traditional Shoshone poem:

“Fair is the white star of twilight, and the sky clearer
At the day’s end; but she is fairer, and she is dearer,
She, my heart’s friend.

Fair is the white star of twilight, and the moon roving
To the sky’s end; but she is fairer, better worth loving,
She, my heart’s friend.”

So the only thing left is to live happily ever after…right?

Angela K Couch lives in Alberta, Canada with her “hero” and three munchkins. Fascinated by history and in love with creating fiction, she's been lost in writing most of her life. As a passionate believer in Christ, she can't help her faith from permeating the stories she tells. Often her martial arts training, love of horses, and appreciation for good romance sneak in there as well. She has been a finalist and semi-finalist in several short story contests and was a semifinalist in the 2015 Genesis Contest. Visit her at www.angelakcouch.com, follow on Twitter or Facebook, and find on Amazon and Goodreads!

16 comments:

  1. Beautiful thank you and that is such an amazing picture.

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  2. Terrill Rosado (trosado)August 18, 2015 at 5:24 AM

    In your research, Angela, do you know if most Native American Tribes were monogamous? What a beautiful tradition of the Shoshone. It's really sad that I don't know more about Native American history besides what I have gathered from TV or biased public school history books of the 80's. Thank you for the enlightening post. I will be very interested in your new book when it is published.

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    1. I only know that the Shoshone were. I'll definitely make sure everyone knows when my book is available :) Thanks!

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  3. Thanks for this interesting post, Angela. I've researched Native Americans as well and was surprised to find that some had a way of divorcing. The woman would pack up her husband's belongings and leave them outside their dwelling, signifying divorce. Pretty simple.

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    1. That would be pretty simple. I doubt it happened as often as it does now, though. Working together to meet the basic needs of life is good for bonding :) Thanks for stopping by!

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    2. I must admit that my knowledge of Native Americans came from television and movies and I know that wasn't always accurate. I enjoyed reading the wedding vows that you shared.
      Blessings!
      Connie
      cps1950 AT gmail DOT com

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  4. It must have taken a lot of research to be able to share the marriage customs of the Shoshone tribe. It is interesting.

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    1. Research is the fun part of writing historical romance :) ... because it is interesting. Thanks for stopping by!

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  5. Beautiful vows! I like how it equates the love for one another with the beauty of God's creation.

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  6. Love this, Angela! And can't wait to read more from you!

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  7. Always glad to find another Canadian author to add to my Canadian Book Challenge reading!

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    1. Great! I'm quite glad to be a Canadian author ;)

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  8. Love the painting, Angela. Love this story ... so glad to be your crit partner because I get to read your great stories first :)

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